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Glossary of textile decoration

EARLY AMERICAN

A style developed by the first American settlers. Its aesthetic is based on very simple patterns printed on linen or cotton cloth, in a limited colour range (either indigo on white or red on white). See also Patchwork.

ECRU

Refers to a matte shade of white. Used for net curtains, it dims the light, and its plain cloth version is ideal for elegant curtains or seat covers. It is also great carpet material, as it easily lends itself to intricate patterns.

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

See style entry The eighteenth century is an era of refinement and technical prowess. Three different styles dominate the century, all named after three kings of France, although actual dates and actual reigns do not exactly match: Regency Style (1700-1720) Philippe d’Orléans is the Regent of France (1715-1723). As soon as 1700, lines get smoother to give birth to Rocaille style. Two patterns are typical of this era: Dessin à la dentelle and Bizarres. Louis XV style (1720-1750) could be defined as the apitome of Regency style. Patterns become asymmetrical and feature shells and curves. Blooming flowers slightly leaning to one side. Fur trims become a decorative must up until the reign of Louis XVI. Chinoiserie style is also all the rage. Louis XVI style (1750-1793). Around 1750, the decorative arts, under the influence of Madame de Pompadour, are dominated by a more understated and Antiquity-inspired aesthetic. Stripes, Arabesque motifs and symmetrical compositions are all the rage. This era is also that of a return to nature as advocated by Roussea, and symbolised by Marie Antoinette’s hamlet. Floral prints are realistic looking. Monochrome Jouy print featuring scenes with characters are also very popular. See a product

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY STYLE

The eighteenth century is an era of refinement and technical prowess. Three different styles dominate the century, all named after three kings of France, although actual dates and actual reigns do not exactly match: Regency Style (1700-1720) Philippe d’Orléans is the Regent of France (1715-1723). As soon as 1700, lines get smoother to give birth to Rocaille style. Two patterns are typical of this era: Dessin à la dentelle and Bizarres. Louis XV style (1720-1750) could be defined as the apitome of Regency style. Patterns become asymmetrical and feature shells and curves, or blooming flowers slightly leaning to one side. Fur trims become a decorative must up until the reign of Louis XVI. Chinoiserie style is also all the rage. Louis XVI style (1750-1793). Around 1750, the decorative arts, under the influence of Madame de Pompadour, are dominated by a more understated and Antiquity-inspired aesthetic. Stripes, Arabesque motifs and symmetrical compositions are all the rage. This era is also that of a return to nature as advocated by Roussea, and symbolised by Marie Antoinette’s hamlet. Floral prints are realistic looking. Monochrome Jouy print featuring scenes with characters are also very popular. See a product See a selection

EMBROIDERY

Refers to the handicraft of decorating fabric with needle and thread. It remained for centuries the privilege of the rich and powerful. Machine embroidery has now become prevalent, and is used to customize and decorate fabrics, household linens, sheer curtains, bed sheets or even lamp shades, braids and trims. See a product

EMERIZING

Surface finish, giving a soft, suede-like touch. Fabric undergoes treatment by abrasive roller with the use of emery or glass powder. See a product

ENGRAVING

Refers to a process used for fabric printing, stamping and gauffering involving cylinders or screens being engraved with a pattern. All Pierre Frey screen prints are engraved prior to printing, and quality engraving is a key step to ensure the beauty of a pattern.

EPINGLé VELVET

A type of velvet fabric featuring uncut loop piles. It is available in wool and cotton. Its hard-wearing quality makes it perfect material for seat covers. It is very versatile and may easily be sewn, braided or turned into a rug. Example: Bakou F2798. See a product