LOUVRE x PIERRE FREY

On the occasion of the bicentenary of the deciphering of the hieroglyphs by Champollion (1822), the father of Egyptology and founder of the Egyptian Antiquities Department of the Louvre Museum (1827), Pierre Frey is unveiling "Merveilles d'Egypte", a new collection of fabrics, wallpapers and carpets, full of colour and rich in motifs. Among these new items, eight references are the result of a completely new collaboration with the Louvre Museum in Paris.

The works in the museum's Department of Egyptian Antiquities illustrate the evolution of civilisation on the banks of the Nile from the end of prehistoric times to the Christian era. The richness of this collection, which has never ceased to fascinate scientists, historians and artists, now fascinates the Maison Pierre Frey.

Following meticulous research, eight works have been selected from the seven thousand on display in the Egyptian Antiquities Gallery. Between faithful reproductions and free inspiration, the creative team of the Pierre Frey House was keen to respect the authenticity of these works while bringing a contemporary and graphic interpretation, guided by three fundamental aspects: colour, material and geometry.

 

COLOUR

The creative team's approach is based on absolute respect for the colours of the original object. The colours are thus calm and poetic, faded and muted by time, as we can see them today in the Louvre Museum, or declined in bright, strong and rich colours as they were originally intended to be, celebrating an Egypt of a thousand joyful hues.

THE MATERIAL

The design studio has carried out extensive research on materials to bring movement, texture and character to the collection. 3D printing offers a faithful reproduction of the relief and details of the frescoes and hieroglyphs. Pushed to its limits thanks to a play of matte and metallic lights, this technique brilliantly retranscribes the repoussage work used by the craftsmen of the New Kingdom. The raffia echoes the papyrus of the Nile, the jacquards evoke the weaving of basketry, the Genoa velvets shine like the facets of a luxurious jewel, while the richness of the embroidery pays homage to the creation and know-how of the craftsmen of ancient Egypt.

 

GEOMETRY

The archives of Egyptian civilisation display a variety of recurring motifs. To represent this geometry in the collection's designs, the designers carefully examined every detail of the works in order to tame them while injecting a touch of Pierre Frey DNA. This geometric character is particularly apparent in the stripe inspired by the lid of an Egyptian coffin, freely evoking the fabulous finery of the pharaohs.

 

Le scribe: This composition faithfully reproduces the mythological papyrus of Nespakachouty, dated to the XXIst dynasty on a matte non-woven paper or a light printed linen. It depicts the scribe accounting for grain in the domain of Amen, as well as the earth god Geb under the vault of heaven represented by Nut.

Hatshepsout : The designs of this fabric, in fabric and wallpaper, come from the decorations of a woman's coffin discovered in the cemetery of Gournet Murrai, dating from the reign of Hatshepsut, queen of Egypt who became pharaoh during the New Kingdom.

Shout : The hand-painted motif of the SHOUT wallpaper reproduces a decorative element from the tunic of the statue The Trough Bearer and recalls the pearl nets worn by women in ancient Egypt.

Tapéret: XXL reproduction of the stuccoed and painted wooden tombstone of the Tapéret lady. The print on a fibrous non-woven paper recalls the grain and nature of the original materials of the work.

Les Marais du Nil: Reproduction of a wall painting from the beginning of the 18th Dynasty representing the shores of the Nile and its luxuriance. The printing on a fibrous non-woven paper gives the drawing depth and substance.

Jehouthy : This wallpaper is inspired by a golden cup offered by Thutmose III to General Jehuthy, the king's trusted man in all foreign lands and in the islands in the middle of the sea to thank him for his services. The metallic or matte 3D printing vividly captures the repoussé technique used by New Kingdom craftsmen to decorate metal cups.

Abkaou: The details engraved on an extract of the limestone decoration of the funerary stele of Abkaou are finely woven on a precious silk and linen damask with a shiny and matte effect or retranscribed in 3D, in an unprecedented way, on a wallpaper.

Pharaon: This stripe, inspired by the lid of an Egyptian coffin and highlighted with elegant metallic reflections, freely evokes the fabulous finery of the pharaohs.

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